Welcome to the National Center for Victims of Crime

We are the nation's leading resource and advocacy organization for crime victims and those who serve them. Please join us as we forge a national commitment to help victims of crime rebuild their lives.

Alaska

Alaska is one of thirty-two states that have amended their constitutions to include rights for crime victims. The amendment passed in the Alaska legislature in the Spring of 1994; it was ratified in November with an 87% voter approval. The amendment, which changed one section of the constitution and added another, reads as follows:

Article 1, Section 12. Criminal Administration

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. Criminal administration shall be based upon the following:

  • the need for protecting the public,
  • community condemnation of the offender,
  • the rights of victims of crimes,
  • restitution from the offender,
  • and the principle of reformation.

Article 2, Section 24. Rights of Crime Victims

Crime victims, as defined by law, shall have the following rights as provided by law:

  • the right to be reasonably protected from the accused through the imposition of appropriate bail or conditions of release by the court;
  • the right to confer with the prosecution;
  • the right to be treated with dignity, respect, and fairness during all phases of the criminal and juvenile justice process;
  • the right to timely disposition of the case following the arrest of the accused;
  • the right to obtain information about and be allowed to be present at all criminal or juvenile proceedings where the accused has the right to be present;
  • the right to be allowed to be heard, upon request, at sentencing, before or after conviction or juvenile adjudication, and at any proceeding where the accused's release from custody is considered;
  • the right to restitution from the accused; and
  • the right to be informed, upon request, of the accused's escape or released from custody before or after conviction or juvenile adjudication.