Welcome to the Stalking Resource Center

The mission of the Stalking Resource Center is to enhance the ability of professionals, organizations, and systems to effectively respond to stalking.

Stalking Statistics and Data


Prevalence and Characteristics of Sexual Violence, Stalking, and Intimate Partner Violence Victimization — National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, United States, 2011

The CDC released “Prevalence and Characteristics of Sexual Violence, Stalking, and Intimate Partner Violence Victimization — National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, United States, 2011,” commonly referred to as NISVS. The report examines sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence victimization using data collected between January and December 2011. This report is the long anticipated follow-up to the report on the 2010 data which was published in 2011.

The stalking specific findings include:

  • 7.5 million people were stalked in one year in the U.S.
  • 61 percent of female victims and 44 percent of male victims were stalking by a current or former intimate partner
  • An estimated 15 percent of women and 6 percent of men have been a victim of stalking during their lifetimes
Due to changes in the methodology of the survey, we cannot make direct comparisons to the 2010 NISVS data. 

While we welcome this new data, we are disappointed that the CDC used a conservative definition of stalking in this report, as it did in the first NISVS report. Survey respondents were classified as stalking victims if 1) they experienced multiple stalking tactics or a single stalking tactic multiple times by the same perpetrator and 2) they felt very fearful or believed that they or someone close to them would be harmed or killed as a result of a perpetrator’s stalking behaviors. This definition fails to take into account the varying levels of fear often reported by victims (i.e. somewhat fearful, slightly fearful). Further, no stalking law in the U.S. qualifies fear in this way. Using this conservative definition of stalking results in an inaccurate depiction of stalking in the United States.

 

To read the full report, click here.

[Matthew J. Breiding et al., “Prevalence and Characteristics of Sexual Violence, Stalking, and Intimate Partner Violence Victimization – National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, United States, 2011”, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 63, No. 8 (2014): 7]


Other Key Research: